Anise Hyssop Oxymel

Anise hyssop oxymel
A flavorful tonic to use for colds and flu.

Ingredients

 Fresh anise hyssop leaves, stems, and blossoms, finely chopped (or dried)
 Good quality honey, preferably raw
 Organic apple cider vinegar
 Clean pint glass jar with a plastic lid (the vinegar will corrode metal)

Instructions

1

Fill the glass jar loosely (do not pack down) with chopped fresh hyssop (or a third full if using dried).

2

Next fill the jar 1/3 of the way with honey (or half full if you want a sweeter preparation).

3

Next pour in the apple cider vinegar to fill the jar. Use a plastic or wooden spoon to mix well.

4

Cover with a plastic lid (vinegar will corrode metal) and label the jar with contents and date.

5

Allow to sit for 2 to 4 weeks in a cool, dark place and shake once a day for the first 2 weeks.

6

Using a wire mesh strainer, strain the mixture, pressing down with the bottom of the jar to release all the liquid. Pour in a clean jar or bottle and label. Remember to use a plastic lid!

7

Oxymels are shelf stable for at least 6 months (when using fresh herbs) or 1 year (using dried herbs). You can also keep it in the fridge for longer preservation.

8

Oxymels can be taken in teaspoon to tablespoon amounts straight or can be added to foods as a way to enhance assimilation of food nutrients and additional health benefits. Try adding a tablespoon to sparkling, still, or warm water or a spoonful to herbal teas or smoothies. For a reviving drink, add a
tablespoon to sparkling water with some grated cucumber and lime juice.

Notes:
The plant anise hyssop has been used for centuries to help clear a congested cough and expel mucus from the lungs. It also may calm anxiety, lift the mood, and bring a sense of well-being. It’s gentle carminative properties also help to relieve gas and aid in digestion. Anise hyssop is a member of the mint family and has a lovely anise/licorice mint flavor.

Can also be used as a salad dressing.

Oxymels (a nutrient-dense herbal preparation made by combining herbs with raw honey and vinegar) have been used for centuries for their health benefits and immune support. The term oxymel comes from the Greek word oxymeli which translates to “acid and honey”.

Some popular herbs used to make oxymels are elderberries (and elderflowers), lemon balm, hyssop, nettle, tulsi (holy basil), mullein, thyme, oregano, rosemary, rosehips, sage and ginger. Since the finished product is a super concentrated herbal extraction, a few teaspoons or a tablespoon is sufficient.

Serves: 32 1-tablespoon servings

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Ingredients

 Fresh anise hyssop leaves, stems, and blossoms, finely chopped (or dried)
 Good quality honey, preferably raw
 Organic apple cider vinegar
 Clean pint glass jar with a plastic lid (the vinegar will corrode metal)

Directions

1

Fill the glass jar loosely (do not pack down) with chopped fresh hyssop (or a third full if using dried).

2

Next fill the jar 1/3 of the way with honey (or half full if you want a sweeter preparation).

3

Next pour in the apple cider vinegar to fill the jar. Use a plastic or wooden spoon to mix well.

4

Cover with a plastic lid (vinegar will corrode metal) and label the jar with contents and date.

5

Allow to sit for 2 to 4 weeks in a cool, dark place and shake once a day for the first 2 weeks.

6

Using a wire mesh strainer, strain the mixture, pressing down with the bottom of the jar to release all the liquid. Pour in a clean jar or bottle and label. Remember to use a plastic lid!

7

Oxymels are shelf stable for at least 6 months (when using fresh herbs) or 1 year (using dried herbs). You can also keep it in the fridge for longer preservation.

8

Oxymels can be taken in teaspoon to tablespoon amounts straight or can be added to foods as a way to enhance assimilation of food nutrients and additional health benefits. Try adding a tablespoon to sparkling, still, or warm water or a spoonful to herbal teas or smoothies. For a reviving drink, add a
tablespoon to sparkling water with some grated cucumber and lime juice.

Notes:
The plant anise hyssop has been used for centuries to help clear a congested cough and expel mucus from the lungs. It also may calm anxiety, lift the mood, and bring a sense of well-being. It’s gentle carminative properties also help to relieve gas and aid in digestion. Anise hyssop is a member of the mint family and has a lovely anise/licorice mint flavor.

Can also be used as a salad dressing.

Oxymels (a nutrient-dense herbal preparation made by combining herbs with raw honey and vinegar) have been used for centuries for their health benefits and immune support. The term oxymel comes from the Greek word oxymeli which translates to “acid and honey”.

Some popular herbs used to make oxymels are elderberries (and elderflowers), lemon balm, hyssop, nettle, tulsi (holy basil), mullein, thyme, oregano, rosemary, rosehips, sage and ginger. Since the finished product is a super concentrated herbal extraction, a few teaspoons or a tablespoon is sufficient.

Serves: 32 1-tablespoon servings

Anise Hyssop Oxymel